Another member’s work for Haiti

by Erandy Pacheco

Last March, I was one of the MiTiN members that answered DePaul University’s call to join a project called Zafèn.  This project was created to help a nation in need, Haiti, by designing a website (www.zafen.com) that allows people from all over the world to boost the Haitian economy through donations and loans to micro, small and medium enterprises. In order to do that, Zafèn receives profiles from such enterprises describing their needs and objectives. Once they are approved, the profiles are translated into English, French and Spanish and posted on the website. Continue reading

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When experience is your only dictionary

by James Kirchner

A few months ago, I did a pro bono translation job for an organization called Traducteurs sans frontières, whose name translates as “Translators Without Borders”. The assignment I was given was a sheet of general local information for people arriving to attend a conference on gender violence that was being held in the Congo.

Everything went smoothly until I reached the section on money. Continue reading

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A MiTiN translator helps Haiti rebuild

by Osaine Gomez-Reamer

I heard of the earthquake in Haiti on the news like most everyone. As attention to the matter grew, through my local TV station, I followed the reports and relief efforts taking place both nationally and locally. I have to admit I was a bit surprised by the involvement of Michigan-based citizens and organizations in that area. Continue reading

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Keep your reader’s level in mind!

by James Kirchner

One occasionally fatal assumption of many translators is that the materials they are writing will be used by people with an advanced, native command of the target language.  However, especially if you’re translating into English, this may not be true. Continue reading

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Why Do Other Translators Get the Good Jobs?

Too many people go into the translation business because they think that all it takes is a basic knowledge of two languages, a computer and a high-speed Internet connection. Without considering the opportunity costs, they’re satisfied making a few cents per word, translating one-off jobs. Over time they’re shocked that they can’t make any serious money, much less a profit. Continue reading

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Put your adjectives in the right place!

by James Kirchner

People who are just starting out in translation often have problems breaking free of the exact words and syntax used in the original text they are working on. It takes attention and practice to learn to translate from image to image, idea to idea, or intended effect to intended effect.

And translating the words as you see them can cause some rather unintended meanings. Continue reading

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Translating for the Hispanic Market in the US

by Olimpia Hernandez

This information is for the Spanish translators and interpreters that translate for the Hispanic market in the US.

During the ATA conference I attended a session in Spanish titled La Traducción para el hispanohablante de EE.UU. During this session I became aware that there is an association that is the authority of the Spanish Language in the US, just like the Real academia de la lengua española is in Spain.  Continue reading

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ATA’S NEW CLIENT OUTREACH KIT, 2009

By Olimpia Hernandez

During the 50th ATA conference, members of the ATA marketing team presented their marketing materials for ATA members including the PowerPoint presentation Putting the POWER of Language to work for your business. This ATA marketing kit was created by Dorothee Racette, Lillian Clementi, and Christine Durban.

During their presentation Lillian and Christine emphasized that in these difficult times it is very important to market our service in the most effective way.  Continue reading

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Best practice: Introduce yourself to the interpreter

by Franco Gamero

Earlier this year I attended a Brake Colloquium in southern Brazil and assisted on a seminar on Heavy Truck Braking Systems at a local manufacturer. This conference was organized by the Society of Automotive Engineers of Brazil.

English was the main language used. I was pleasantly surprised that most of the attendees and staff were fluent in English. There were, however, two interpreters English< >Portuguese.

I introduced myself and MiTiN prior to the conference as they needed to know the contents of the presentations. This is a very important practice because it prepares the interpreter. It also gives a chance to the presenter to clarify some terminology that might be unknown, as was the case with these very highly technical presentations. They did an excellent job and I was pleased to “rate” their interpretation.

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Filed under Interpreting, Terminology

“Probation” in every language, part 2

More of Franco Gamero’s thoughts on the term probation and its international use.

After the experience in Argentina, I began to do Research on Probation. It is an accepted method by the United Nations and was initially accepted by many countries as far back as 1959.

Conclusions of my research: Continue reading

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